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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)
to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of these american families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and others that are watching international adoptions? >> sure, well, i thin
that are going to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financi
else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children. and for the family its of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's a elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon, or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a s
house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust
is the most diverse state in the union. we best represent the upon population of the united states of america. we're very dwirs, but i think we need to show the nation that a group of people committed to the common good can come together and pass a law that's necessary for the public safety, whether you're in a rural area, a suburban or urban area, we all have children. those of white house are parents understand how precious life is. we have a great poeet from illinois, carl sandberg who said, "the birth of a baby is god's opinion the world should go on." it's high time we protect our children, protect our babies from the harm of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> ifill: do you have any sense that public opinion is shifting in your state? >> oh, i believe so. i don't think there's any question. anecdotally, just visiting with the people on the street-- i was at a daycare center today, an early-childhood center, and you can tell how committed moms and dads are to getting a law pads to protect their children. no matter where you live in america, children come first. the
that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made po
of these incidents happening in america makes me say, you know, enough is enough. there's got to be a rational way to sort through this. i'm not saying i've got a perfect piece of legislation. i don't think there is a single perfect piece of legislation. but in a country where we got 30,000 gun deaths a year, there's got to be a way that we can do a bit more. i hope that responsible gun owners around america will join in this conversation as well. i think we have to recognize that it is about rational appropriate gun rules but also about mental health issues. my hope is our country takes a deep breath and doesn't just simply get exercised by this for a few moments and then push this horrible tragedy back into the background and forget about it. >> ifill: assuming that there is is not one single solution here, let's talk about what you mean when you say rational gun control. senator feinstein says an assault weapons ban would be rational. would you agree with that? >> i think that from the evidence i've seen that a lot of the challenge comes around the speed by which you can shoot... in effect, you
. there have been north of 300,000 layoffs. you have seen it at u.b.s., bank of america, which is strug ling with the own acquisitions. you have even seen it at goldman sacs, one of the winners after the financial crisis. it's actually, if you talk to these bank c.e.o.s they will tell you it's a difficult time to run a multinational bank. even with the bailout, and interest rates of 0 for four years, even when they offer you and me nothing on our savings and checking accounts they say in their own defense, we're dealing with unprecedented regulation. we have to curb proprietary trading. we have regulators breathing down our neck and it's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and
immigrants from mexico, central america and the like? now, the mexican economy is also coming back. that actually has been very helpful. mexico now is talking about having its own border patrol on their northern border. that would be very helpful. i think we want to work together with mexico and their new leadership on what we do with respect to illegal migration from central america. but all of these things, as your question says, they all are related with each other s you have to create the right balance. you have to have the right way for people to come in legally. you have to have the right balance for who can come in to work particularly in certain jobs where there's a continued labor shortage. when you do that, it allows us on the enforcement side to focus on those who have more nefarious purposes. >> suarez: now you've been a prosecutor, as you mentioned. you've been an executive, a state executive. but you've also been an elected official long enough to know that this is a political question as well. did november 6 change the calculations on both sides of the aisle? is ther
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of the hour. america's new point man in the middle east. brokering a ceasefire between israel and gaza. since then he's granted himself unlimited power. and rushed through a draft constitution branded by liberals and christians as a betrayal of egypt's transition to democracy. morsi's muslim brotherhood had 70 years in egypt's political wilderness to prepare for government. though his supporters point out that his religiously-worded constitution will easily pass in a referendum set for later this month. >> ( translated ): why are they always afraid of the ballot box? whenever there is an election or a referendum they're afraid of the ballot box. it is because they know the people are not on their side. >> reporter: tahrir square was far from full today. egypt's had its revolution and that, for many, will suffice. yet the president's opponents say another may now be required. >> ( translated ): we didn't have a revolution just to return to the era of mubarak and worse. >> ( translated ): mohamed morsi has divided the nation. we want him to fall. along with the muslim brotherhood because they a
. what does america's insurance map look like now? >> well, as you mentioned, 18 states have said they want to do their own expectings. states have until february to decide if they want to do one in partnership with the federal government. if they decide not to do that, then the federal government wilt build this exchange for them, and exchangees, of course, are where people will go-- individuals and small businesses-- to actuallyre purchase insurance under the new law because, remember, most people will be required to have health insurance or else they'll pay a fine. >> suarez: some big states, texas, florida, have declared they're out. what happens there? >> that's right.feme so in the cases will of those states, then the federal government will come in and build the exchange for them.e so it will look to the consumer, to the small business, the same as it would if the state hadxa done it. there will still be a texasf health insurance anything and a florida health insurance exchange but it will be run byz: the federal government and not by the state. >> suarez: now when when tha
. >> the strength of the nra that more than half of the abuts in america have guns, own guns, have them in their homes. >> brown: they already may be having affect, gun store owners around the country have reported their stock is flying off the shelves. >> we have christmas business, hunting season business now we have the political business. >> brown: back in newtown the focus remained on coping with a christmas ravaged by grief. local post office received a flood of cards with messages of hope and towns people expect to light hundreds of outdoor candles tonight for the 26 shooting victims. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, egypt's troubled referendum; medical marijuana runs into federal law; special elections coming to the senate; helping haiti's orphans; and hundred years of "poetry" magazine. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the christmas of 2012 began arriving around the world this evening. in bethlehem, manger square was adorned in decorations and lights, and christian pilgrims and others celebrated midnight mass at the church of
, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact, upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation, thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet, so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their hopes were going to be realized. and so it really did put a lot of people in motion during that time period. it didn't free the slaves, obviously. the confederates and the people in control of them remained in control until the end of the war. but blacks took a part in liberating themselves
education system has yet to figure out. america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. john danner is the latest to give it a shot. he created an innovative charter school model with replication in mind. charter schools receive public funding but are privately managed and operate outside of the traditional public system. >> our public education system's not really setup for change. >> reporter: before going into education, danner founded and ran a successful silicon valley startup. he designed his new education model after teaching for three years in a traditional public school. >> causing change within that system's really, really difficult. i think that's actually what charter schools were created to do was to shake things up, do things differently. >> good morning, rocketeers. >> reporter: rocketship's seven schools are among the top performing low income schools in california. once open, they operate entirely with public funding. the rockets
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)